Moving to another house in South Korea is the most interesting thing for me when I arrived here. In Korea, you can move just in a day. Interesting right? But aside from moving there are things you need to do before and after. In this article, I will share with you those things.

Honestly moving is very stressful and nobody likes it especially if you personally need to pack and unpack all your things. But here in South Korea, they made it easier for everyone to move by hiring the “Packing Moving Service” or the “Standard Moving Service”.

Moving House Services In  South Korea

1. Packing Moving Service

The “Packing Moving Service” is a bit expensive where you don’t need to lift a finger to pack and unpack your things because they will do everything. This kind of service needs a reservation and before you move they will come to your house to check the furniture and things you have. The lesser furniture you have the better.

Mostly Koreans, throw their cabinets, sofa, drawers, refrigerator, and almost everything because it will cost them more. The cost is mostly the same when you buy a new one. They also believe that when you move into a new house, your things should be new too. But it doesn’t apply to all like us. My husband doesn’t believe in that kind of way. If it’s still working then you can’t buy a new one. At first, I really don’t understand but this time I’m getting his points because earning money here is not a joke.

But honestly, I’ve saved up some money from my online selling to buy some furniture when we move. We have a bulky and heavy dresser and drawers which I really don’t like because I’m having a hard time moving those when I do general cleaning so I want to change those to more simple and easy to move.

2. Standard Moving Service

The “Standard Moving Service” is the cheapest way of moving into another house in Korea but you are the one responsible for packing and unpacking your things. Then a delivery truck or “Bongo” will come to your house to load up your things and unloads it to your new house. Students or those who live alone uses this kind of service since they don’t have much stuff to move.

This time we are moving not because we want it but it’s the unexpected decision of the owner of the house. We finished our 2 years contract and we agreed to extend but she suddenly changed her mind. In Korea, when your contract has been extended and the landlord asked you to move suddenly you can ask for the moving expenses.

But before and after moving there are important things you need to do. Here, you can’t just move and that’s it.  Moving into another house requires preparation so here are the things to be remembered when moving house in South Korea.

Things To Be Remembered When Moving House

1. Change of Address

All residents of Korea need to report their change of address within 14 days if not there is a penalty of 50,000 won per day. Even foreigners who live in Korea need to do this task.

2. Gas, Water, and Electricity

Upon moving these three should be called because they need to do a meter reading before you move so you can pay your utility bills before moving. The same with the new house you were moving in. The gas provider should be called a day before you move because they will disconnect the gas supply since you are moving out then they will do a reconnection to your new house.

3. Telephone and Internet

Well, the internet is life! So don’t forget this one before moving. You need to call your network provider to terminate or relocate your internet. Usually, they come the day after you moved in. Remember that there’s an installation fee at the new address.

4. Health Insurance and Taxes

After moving and reporting your change of address you need to call or go personally to the health insurance office or tax office to notify them that you moved into a new address.

5.  Sticker for furniture disposal

Moving in South Korea is very stressful since you can’t just throw garbages nor the things you don’t need easily. For big furniture like tables, chairs, cabinets, refrigerators, beds and etc, you need to get a sticker for that so that the garbage truck will pick up those items. No sticker, no pick-up. Each furniture has its designated amount like 1000 won to 10,000 won. The bigger the size the more expensive.

Today I went to the local center and fill out a paper called 배출신고서 (Bae-chul-singo-seo), it’s a like a registration form for garbages. I need to throw one tv divider, two tables, one chair, and a big styro box and these items cost me 10,000 won.  Electronic goods with small sizes like rice cookers, printer, and others,  still need to report but you don’t need to pay anymore. Clothing and beddings are thrown separately in the recycle bin. Plastics and general wastes have their own plastics so just need to buy those plastics. It’s pretty hard to segregate garbages especially if you live in a 주택 (jutaek), a house that doesn’t have the waste management like those in apartments.

That’s why some Koreans these days are trying to give away or sell their furniture and other things before moving. I did the same, I gave some of the things we don’t really use to lessen our stuff.

Anyway, those are the important things you need to consider and remember when moving into another house in Korea. Aside from those things looking for a new house is also the most important thing before moving. I will share some details about this in my next article.

Tomorrow, we will be moving and I hope everything will go smoothly. Happy Moving!

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16 thoughts on “Moving House in South Korea”

  1. Wow! You live na pala in Korea! Jusme sa pagtapon ng gamit no? Siguro aside from being cost effective, mejo sentimental din tayo when it comes to our stuff? I mean, hello, pinaghirapan natin yun hehehe… but different strokes for different folks 🙂

  2. This is a nice article! With the different stresses on moving, it is really worth it to avail of this service. Convenient and hassle-free! Also, the things you listed to consider in transferring is a big help. Some might miss the detail and could have future headaches.

  3. Wah ang hassle din pala ng lipat lipat. akala ko basta ka lang lilipat keri na. Especially yung sa garbage pero kung efficient naman sila no prob. Dito kasi sa pinas alamo naman. Hahahaha kahirap!

  4. i got the packing moving service. they are so efficient. the ajumma doesn’t even want me to help in unpacking because i’m bothering her system, lol. i just rearrange when they’re done.

    1. Yes super expensive, 40k pesos ung binayaran naman sa Packing Moving Service, nagbayad pa kami na kuryente,tubig at gas bill.
      Iba pa yung commission nung real estate so nakakstress maglipat.

  5. Grabe! This will be very useful for other Pinays who live in South Korea. Ang dami pala talagang kailangan gawin bago makapaglipat ng bahay. Ako naman, madalas nangunguha ng stuff ng kapitbahay ko na iniiwan sa mga poste hahaha!

  6. I am dying to go there too! pero parang ang hirap talaga mag adjust lalo na pag bago. Thanks for this article! Balak ko pa naman mag abroad. ❤️

  7. Grabe ang daming kailangan gawin to move! But actually it makes sense! I like that they need to inform the local authorities for the change in address ~ para nga naman safe and everyone is accountable for. Also, nakakaaliw naman yung no sticker no pick-up ng garbage collector dyan! Dito, unahan pa yung mga garbage collectors kasi mabebenta nila agad yun! 😀 I guess sobrang disciplined talaga ng koreans! 🙂

  8. Good luck on your move! I enjoyed this article and found it really interesting. I love how organized it is there. My family has been wanting to move out of out small house, but it is so difficult because they don’t like to get rid of any boxes, old furniture or old appliances. But, reading this helps me gain a new perspective that i’d like to try out.

  9. Moving is really hard, you have a lot of things to consider and prepare. Glad to know the process and tips on how to move places there in Korea.

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